HSCG & IBN Membership Rebate Program

Handmade Soap Makers Guild

Handmade Soap Makers Guild

Handcrafted Soap & Cosmetics Guild & Indie Business Network Membership Rebate Program RESTARTS ON APRIL 1, 2013

Soapalooza Soap Arts Studio is very excited to announce the reinstatement of the Business Insurance Rebate Program. This is the same HSMG and IBN business insurance rebate program that I designed when I formerly ran Southern Soapers. Please read the press release below with details:

Soapalooza Soap Arts Studio will reimburse $20 of your new or renewing Handcrafted Soap & Cosmetics Guild membership

Indie Beauty Network

Indie Beauty Network

dues. Alternatively, we will reimburse $20 of your new or renewing Indie Business Network membership dues. Simply forward us a copy of your PDF insurance certificate to Kelly@Soapalooza.com

Who is eligible? This Rebate Program is for anyone initially joining or renewing membership with the Handcrafted Soap & Cosmetics Guild or the Indie Beauty Network. Only one rebate per person or business, either the HSMG or the IBN rebate, not both.

What is the Rebate? Soapalooza Soap Arts Studio will issue a Gift Certificate for $20 of the Handcrafted Soap & Cosmetics Guild membership dues OR a Gift Certificate for $20 of the Indie Business Network membership dues.

Why are we doing this? If you are selling soap, candles, or cosmetics and toiletries than you need Business & Product Liability Insurance. It only takes one customer to spin your world out of control. Please do not take chances with your assets, don’t sell without insurance. The Handcrafted Soap & Cosmetics Guild insurance policy is the same policy available through the Indie Business Network.

What does it cost to join the HSCG or the IBN? The Handcrafted Soap & Cosmetics Guild the Independent Business Network have their membership plans posted on their website:

HSMG: http://www.soapguild.org

IBN: http://www.indiebeautynetwork.com

There is a membership that will suit every soapmaker or cosmetic formulator.

Why should I join? Joining a professional trade association in your industry helps keep you aware of regulatory issues and concerns, provides education and business assistance, creates networking opportunities, and raises the level of professionalism as well as creates an esprit de corps among association members. Joining one or both of the preeminent professional trade associations in our industry provide you with tools to help your business thrive. Additionally, you will not likely find as comprehensive or affordable Business & Product Liability Insurance at the non-hobby level.

You can call us at 757-804-0416 for more details.

(This Rebate Program is sponsored solely by Soapalooza Soap Arts Studio, formerly Southern Soapers Fragrances. Please do not request your rebate from the Handcrafted Soap & Cosmetics Guild or the Independent Business Network. This Rebate Program is valid for new and renewing memberships starting April 1, 2013 and until further notice. Not retroactive for memberships already purchased prior to April 1, 2013. Rebate limited to one per person or business per year. Minimum purchase required.

Natural Blue and Red in CP soap

Indigo Blue and Australian Red Reef Clay Natural Colorants in CP

Indigo Blue and Australian Red Reef Clay Natural Colorants in CP Soapmaking


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/A few years ago I gave a presentation at the Handmade Soap Makers Guild on how to create a cut out Cold Process Embed soap design. The presentation also showed how you can achieve a natural Blue in Cold Process soap. I will put this information up here again so that you can learn how to use Indigo in your Cold Process soapmaking.
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Soapalooza is on Instagram!

Hey, Soapalooza is on Instagram! Be sure to mark your soap or product images with #soapalooza so we can build a cool soap porn community! Remember more Likes means more views, and more views mean more sales! Lets have fun posting our cool soap photos to make a soap picture / soap porn image map. (soap porn is not XXX, it is just awesome soap photos!).
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March 2 Soapmaking Class

soapJust a reminder, the March 2 Cold Process Soapmaking Class 101 registration deadline is coming up in a few days. Feb 28 is the last day to enroll. We have 2 more seats available for this really fun class. If you have been on the fence about working with Sodium Hydroxide (lye), this is the class to debunk the fear. You will learn the correct safety measures, how to handle, store, and use Sodium Hydroxide to make natural soap. Think of a Science Project on Steroids! It will be fun, with a lunch break provided. Sign up in the webstore in the Learn to Make Soap or Natural Soapmaking Classes links.

USPS International Shipping Enabled

usps_logoThe Soapalooza Soap Arts Studio shopping cart is now enabled with USPS Shipping, both Domestic and International. Keep in mind that fragrance and essential oils must have a flashpoint of 200 degrees or higher in order to ship by USPS.
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/I’ve tested the software out with a variety of International address locations to verify that the rates are accurate, and to adjust for countries that do not have 5 digit zip codes.

Chocolate Decadence Milk Bath

4 c NatrasorbChocSpa
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/4 c powdered Goat Milk
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/1 cup fine grain salt
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/1/2 c citric acid
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/1/2 to 3/4 c SLSA
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/1 c oat flour (optional)
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/3T Chocolate fragrance
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/Spritz Chocolate fragrance on Natrasorb then add the remaining ingredients until blend is smooth and dry.
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/Oat flour adds to the humectants properties and citric aids in the dispersion to create a luxurious and silky chocolate scented Milk Bath. Non staining and Calorie Free!
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/I will be teaching students to make this and the Chocolate Facial Mask later this month at the Richmond studio.
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/This fun facial mask formulation was developed by Andree Terry of Essential Soaps Inc.

Where Have I Been?

soapalooza-making-good-clean-funI know I have kind of been living under a rock for the last 18 months or so, reorganizing my life back into a semblance of stability after my divorce. Trying on and casting off what did not fit anymore.
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/But, today I just realized that there are SOAP GROUPS on Facebook!  How exciting! I joined five! And I also made one for Soapalooza Studio Facebook Group. How cool is that? I have to quickly hurdle the learning curve of the technology behind the FB Groups, but I’m a quick study.
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Soapmaking Classes in March

CPsoapwHerbsI am giving Basic Cold Process and Advanced Cold Process soapmaking workshops in next month in March.

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/I’m limiting each class to about 8 students so we can retain the small intimate classroom setting. This give lots of hands on and my ability to work individually with all students. Classes will be 3 to 3 1/2 hours for 101, and about 4 to 5 hours for 201. Students will learn the basics of soapmaking, safety issues, and debunk the scary math, science, lye usage aspects. You will leave with fresh, handcrafted soap, information, links for calculators, packaging, labeling, and selling tips, as well as soapmaking formulas/recipes. Best of all, you are going to have a BLAST in these classes also!
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/Class Info:
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/Basic Natural Cold Process 101, March 2, 2013. 1 pm to 4 pm.
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/Advanced Natural Cold Process 201, March 16, 2013. 1 pm to 5:30 pm.
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/Location:
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/Crossroads Art Center
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/2016 Staples Mill Road
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/Richmond, VA 23230
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If you live in the Richmond area, hurry and sign up at the links above, space is limited.

Superfatting – What is it?

Blackberry Apple Cold Process Soap

Blackberry Apple Cold Process Soap


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/First to simplify, “super fatting” is the purposeful unbalancing of a chemical equation or mole.  You normally would balance the lye solution (alkali) to equally match the acids in the oils you are using to a perfect 1:1 chemical mole balance. That would give you excellent laundry soap, but would not be very emollient to your skin.
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/The object of ‘super fatting’ is to have your formulation of lye solution and oils set up to be oil heavy, meaning that there will be more oil molecules than lye molecules and the match up of covalent bonding will leave excess unused oil molecules free in your soap mixture/soap bars. This is where you get the extra emollient properties of your soap, or some… as the glycerin is a contributor too.  So essentially, ‘super fatting’ is just making sure you leave a little extra oil free in your soap.
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/There are two ways to do this.  Either one is absolutely fine, or if you set your calculations up right you can even do both together. It is a purely personal choice on HOW you decide to super fat, just be sure and use a good calculator when formulating so you can be precise.
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/Method 1:  Effective Lye Discount/Ratio (referred as either on some calculators, ELD or ELR)
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/This is where you do not add extra oils at trace to create your “super fat’ effect. You build in an automatic ELR when you set up your formulation in your calculator to create the lye discount you want… 5%, 6%, 7% are the most common values. Setting your calculator to leave 5% is superfat built into the formulation. Lower than 5% without adding additional fats/oils at trace can contribute to a harsher bar, and super fatting over 10% can lend toward the loose oils going rancid faster in time.  I recommend 6% – 7% to start with. Superfatting at 0% is a perfect balance of oils and lye (acid & alkali), however it is generally too harsh of soap for the body.
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/Most calculators allow you to adjust the lye discount/effective lye ratio figure. You plug all your oils in the calculator to be mixed with the lye in the beginning.  The only value that changes the super fat/ELR value is the AMOUNT OF LYE USED. Less lye means the ELR super fatting increases to larger numbers (i.e., reducing lye by 1 oz may cause the ELR super fatting to go up from 6% to 7%). Increasing lye value lowers the ELR super fatting (i.e., increasing lye by 1 oz may cause the ELR super fat to go from 6% to 5%).  You can manually adjust this by changing the lye value in your calculator until you have the % of super fat/ELR that you want your bar to have.
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/Method 2:  Super fatting  at Trace
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/This way you build your formulation up with a small amount (2-5% of total oils used) to be added at the mid to end of trace time. You set your formulation up with a much lower Effective Lye Ratio, often at zero.
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/After you calculate the lye needed for your main base oils, you then input extra oils to the calculator that are to be added separately at trace. Adjust that super fat oil amount until you arrive at the super fat/ELR value you want your bar to end up at.  Using this way of super fatting though, you will use more lye in your formulating. The hypothesis to superfatting at trace is that you have more control of which oils actually create the final superfat effect that is residual in the final bar (more on this at the end). For instance, if you make a bar of soap using coconut, palm, and olive as the soap recipe, but add Hempseed oil at trace,  the first three oils will have used up most lye by the time you add the Hempseed as the superfat oil. The hypothesis is that less Hempseed oil will be tied up by the remaining lye, leaving more Hempseed free than the other oils.
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/If you don’t start at zero superfat for this method you will have an extremely high superfat when you also add extra oils at the trace. High superfat bars can go rancid, developing off odor and sometimes brownish orange spots referred to as DOS, or Dreaded Orange Spots.
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/Showing how superfat at trace consumes more lye:
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/Follow along with this example of a four-oil recipe (and feel free to use it as a starter recipe):
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/All amounts are digital weights, not volume.
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/10 oz Olive Oil
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/10 oz Coconut Oil
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/10 oz Shortening
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/2 oz Sweet Almond Oil
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/11 oz Water
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/4.5 oz lye
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/Now here is what happens to the lye when you add the almond oil with the others (as in Method 1), and what happens when you add it at the end of trace:
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/Method 1:   4.5 oz Lye gives a 6% lye ratio/discount in the calculator and in the final bar a 7.6% effective Lye Ratio, or super fat.
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/But if I do not add that 2 oz of Sweet Almond oil until the end of trace (as in Method 2) look what happens:
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/Method 2:    4.5 oz lye gives a 6% lye discount and in the final bar (with Sweet Almond added at END OF TRACE, not with rest of oils) an 11.7% Effective Lye Ratio, or SUPER super fat!  11.7 is terribly high. Many oils we use for superfatting have shorter shelf lives and by merit of that can go rancid much faster.  To pull the Effective Lye Ratio DOWN a bit, so that the bar is not at 11.7% I must INCREASE my lye value on the calculator, or reduce those trace time superfatting oils to a smaller amount!  I must use 4.6 oz of lye instead of 4.5 oz to get that 6% super fat ratio!
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/The reason why the super fat oils added at trace create a higher superfat value and/or cause more lye to be used in the formulation, is because when you mix your oils & lye solution first, then add trace oils last, much of your lye solution has already been saponified with the main pot of oils!  That means there is less active lye to bind up with oil added at trace super fat oils.
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/Now the Million Dollar Question… Can you Control or Manipulate which oils will be the SuperFat oils?
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/Ok… taking the concept from the previous example of Method 2, adding selected supefat oils at trace, one sees that larger amounts of the superfat oils are left remaining available, free, loose in the bar to affect the skin. The superfat % is actually higher when the same exact amount of total oils are used to make soap, when  the superfat oils are added at trace rather than upfront with the main base oils in the form of lye discount. Since these oils are added at trace, and less of them bound up by lye solution, it is hypothesised that those are the unused oils that remain in the bar to create the superfat effect for the skin.
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/Because we can see that there is a higher percentage of unsaponified oils available in the soap when superfatting is conducted at trace, superfatting at trace allows possible control over which oil properties are the effective superfatting oils.  If one adds Jojoba oil at trace instead of adding to the main base oils and taking a lye discount, the hypothesis is that there will be more free Jojoba molecules free in the final bar with the trace superfatting method than with the lye discount method.
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/The #1 disadvantage to adding oils as superfat at trace though is that it is very easy to forget to add them, leaving you with a batch of soap that is lye heavy, or just harsher than you intended. It is very easy to get distracted and to forget to add those last few ounces of superfat oil when entranced watching soap trace!
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/© 2006 Kelly Bloom, Soapalooza! Soap Arts Studio & BloomWorks Holdings, LLC. All text, photos, graphics, artwork and other material in this work are copyrighted. This article must be accompanied with this copyright notice when distributed. Visit http://www.soapalooza.com for more soapmaking information and tutorials.

How Much Soap Formula Do I Need?

SoapLogsThis math calculation will let you know how much soap formula you will need for any square or rectangle container you are contemplating using as a soap mold.
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/length of your mold x width of your mold x height/depth of soap bars x .40 = ounces of soap formula
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/Example: My log molds are  9? x 3.5? and I pour my soap to 2.5? high. To find out how much soap formula you need for this log mold, you calculate the following:
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/9?  x  3.5?  x  2.5?  x  0.40  =  31.5  ounces for your total soap formula
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/You may find, depending on the temps you soap at, that multiplying by 0.39 or 0.38 work better. Logs of soap can sometimes ‘heave’ or rise, depending on heat and additives.
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/I use the 0.38 when I use my log molds, and the 0.40 when I use my larger slab molds.
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/Knowing this little bit of math frees you up to confiscate ANY rectangular object that has possibilities as a soap mold. Tell your family to beware!
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/© 2006 Kelly Bloom, Soapalooza! Soap Arts Studio & BloomWorks Holdings, LLC. All text, photos, graphics, artwork and other material in this work are copyrighted and may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission. Visit http://www.soapalooza.com for more information.